Science

3 Odd Discoveries by Archeologists

Archeologists have unearthed many discoveries over the years, from century-old vases to human remains buried for hundreds of years. Among these remnants of history are odd artifacts that add to the mystery and uniqueness of science and history.

Here are three of the weirdest discoveries unearthed through the years:

The Screaming Mummies

In 1886, a discovery was made by then the head of the Egyptian Antiquities Service, one of what seemed to be a screaming mummy. It was the remains of a man covered with sheepskin and with hands and feet tied. What is odd is not only the use of what is considered unclean material to cover the body but also the widely opened mouth of the man that suggested he was either buried alive or while in pain. There have been other discoveries like this, thus the term screaming mummies came about. However, some critics say that this was nothing to be alarmed about. They say that if the mouth was not secure during mummification, it is but natural for the mouth to hang open after some time.

The-Screaming-Mummies

Baigong Pipes

In China, the discovery of a mountain containing three triangular openings baffled archeologists. Buried deep down the mountain and the lake were hundreds of uniformly cut pipes with the larger ones measuring up to 40 cms. What makes them more mysterious is the fact that these pipes seemed to have existed even before people have started to use casting irons, around 150,000 years ago. Some speculations suggest that these pipes must have been used by aliens since there were materials of silica which can be traced back to Mars.

Devils_postpile_NM

Tomb of Sunken Skulls

Less than 10 years ago, archeologists unearthed at least eleven skulls in a dry lake in Sweden, along with animal bones and weaponry. They found out that these remains were about 8,000 years old. What makes this discovery strange is that inside the 10th skull, fragments of the 11th skull were found.

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